Saturday, April 27, 2019

SMACKDOWN: Leslie McQuade Gets CRUSHED By Appalachian Witch!

Dear reader,

Leslie McQuade comes from humble beginnings. Her story is a rags to riches tale that began in the coal camps and trailer parks of West Virginia. Leslie began her magical career in the forests of the Appalachian mountains. 

Leslie makes no secret of of her humble beginnings, but she doesn't take enough credit for how far she has come. At least not usually.

But then again, today is different. It isn't every day Leslie gets taken to the woodshed by an Appalachian Witch!

This whole sordid affair began with this video we published on YouTube, Appalachian Mountain Magick. You can see it here.


For whatever the reason (watch the video and read below for full effect!), the net result of showing this video to an Appalachian Witch named Jake Richards, was like showing a red cape to a bull.

Jake Richards wrote:

"This is not Appalachian folk magic. I was raised in this work, mama is a seventh daughter, her daddy was a preacher who could blow out fire and stop the flow of blood, most of my grandmothers had the Sight and so on. 
Appalachian folk magic surrounds the home and livelihood, whether it was to get the cows to milk again or send a troublesome person on their way... This "charm jar" is fake, theres nothing to that in this work that aided the old folks. we had the penny jar/jug and the mourning jar but those are very different from this "trinket jar" you are showing. 
This is utter cultural appropriation at its finest. I was raised on this work and we was so poor we didn't have a bucket to piss in or a window to toss it out of... I swear if it wasn't for these charms and remedies we may not have survived most times, whether it was to come across some money or to keep the roof over our heads. This is our work, our heritage, our blood. 
I may sound like I'm coming off as a dick, but we had to survive using these tricks and superstitions and remedies, we didn't have health insurance or lots of money. and then to see all these well-off folks who ain't even from there trying to tell a thing or two about it is ridiculous. We don't care much for outsiders and shit like this doesn't go in yall's favor.  
Leave our story and tales for us to tell. If you want to learn about authentic Appalachian folk magic, learn it from someone like me who was raised on the workings and tales: My book on it is available for pre-oder on Amazon should you so choose to get a better understanding of it. Its called Backwoods Witchcraft: Conjure & Folk Magic from Appalachia.  
But please don't teach on something you don't know, especially when it deals with America"s "Forgotten People." We've been dealt enough and are well to be left alone, especially in regards to our dying traditions. 
Sharing stuff like this further kills it, because this is a foreign mixture, much like kudzu it'll eventually smother everything else out and the newer generations will never see the fullness of the magic that aided their Ancestors."
Being the chivalrous individual I am, I stepped in on Leslie's behalf, and replied to Jake with a rebuke he well deserved, as follows...
"Hi Jake, Welcome to the HOGD channel. I am delighted to hear that you are preserving Appalachian folk Magick. I am leaving up your ad for your book in your comment so that hopefully people can find it. 
I will have to set you straight about a thing or two, however. Leslie Morgan McQuade is about as Appalachian as dobro music, so you make yourself look silly when you show up on our channel ranting like that, yet without so much as even knowing that Leslie hails from the West Virginia Morgan clan! Or have you never heard of Morgan Morgan, the founder of West Virginia?
Or how about the legendary Tut Taylor the dobro player? Have you ever heard of him, perhaps from Merlefest? Or how about Corey Lee (Lone Wolf) McQuade, Leslie's brother, who Tut Taylor willed his dobro to? 
Leslie asked me to tell pass you this message: 
"Hi Jake. Appalachia is a big place. Just because you know your holler, doesn't mean you know mine!" 
So, Jake, next time before accusing someone of cultural appropriation, you might want to find out who it is you are talking too. Clearly you know a thing or two about Appalachian Magick, but what makes you think you are ONLY Appalachian who does? 
In any case, we're glad you stopped by here and we hope you will return. We have videos on MANY forms of Magick. Let us know once your book "Backwoods Witchcraft" comes out, and perhaps we will have you on our show via Skype to tell our viewers all about it. It looks like it might be an interesting book for them! 
But just one thing. The next time you drop by, there is no need to make all that racket. We can hear you just fine."
Jake Richards wrote a book called Backwoods Witchcraft, that is scheduled for release on June 1, 2019.

Backwoods Witchcraft might be an interesting read. We shall see.

In abundance, chivalry, and truth,
David Griffin